Think Celine Dion is dead? Your Facebook profile may be compromised

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Yes, she's alive: Celine Dion promoted her new album, Loved Me Back To Life, on NBC's Today Show on Monday, ending Facebook rumours that she had been killed in a car accident or plane crash.

Yes, she’s alive: Celine Dion promoted her new album, Loved Me Back To Life, on NBC’s Today Show on Monday, ending Facebook rumours that she had been killed in a car accident or plane crash.

Contrary to death reports on social media, Celine Dion’s heart will go on.

As reported by Contactmusic.com, the Canadian chanteuse was recently the victim of yet another death hoax perpetrated via Facebook.

Last week, two separate Facebook apps reported the shocking news that Dion had perished in a car and airplane accident, respectively.

The phony news bulletins, purporting to be from CNN and Fox News, read “R.I.P. Celine Dion 1968 – 2013” and “Her heart will go on? Celine Dion died in a car accident.”

The faux CNN post elaborated: “Hollywood Breaking News – R.I.P. Celine Dion. At about 11 a.m. ET on Sunday (October 20, 2013), Celine Dion died in a plane crash.” The report went on to claim the accident took place at a location called “Denver-Peak Regional Airport.”

The fake Fox News obit was only slightly more imaginative, stating, “Investigators have told reporters that Celine Dion lost control while driving a friend’s vehicle on Interstate 80 and rolled the vehicle several times killing her instantly. The vehicle was believed to have been traveling at approximately 95 miles per hour in a 55mph zone at the time of the accident.”

The consumer site About.com reports that the bogus death reports are rogue apps designed to steal profile information from Facebook users. The app’s goal is to reproduce itself countless times as users post the startling news on each member’s friends list. Sneaky, yes?

Weirdly, as Contact Music notes, this is the second time that rumours of Dion’s death have been greatly exaggerated on social media. The same claim surfaced on a prank website in March, 2012, when “R.I.P Celine Dion” suddenly began trending worldwide on Twitter.

And sadly, fake celebrity death notices are by now a way of life. Other stars who have been victimized by the hoaxes in recent memory include Justin Bieber, Bill Nye, Jackie Chan, Morgan Freeman and Britney Spears.

Courtesy of The Globe and Mail

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