How to Treat the Flu

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on RedditEmail this to someone
For the flu vaccine, the evidence-based medical advice is clear: It is ineffective and there is no compelling reason to require anyone to receive a yearly flu shot.

For the flu vaccine, the evidence-based medical advice is clear: It is ineffective and there is no compelling reason to require anyone to receive a yearly flu shot.

Question: What should I do if I catch the flu this season?

 Dr. Brownstein’s Answer:

The medications Tamiflu and Relenza are not good options for treating the flu. They are ineffective and expensive, and are associated with severe side effects.

For acute viral infections, including the flu, supplementing with vitamin D3 (50,000 units per day), vitamin A (100,000 units per day), and vitamin C (10,000 mg twice per day, if your stomach can tolerate it) is very helpful for the immune system. However, you should not take these large doses for more than two days without consulting a healthcare provider.

Alpha lipoic acid (300 mg twice per day) will also help fight the flu.

There is a clear lack of evidence that the flu vaccine is effective at preventing the flu and the adverse consequences of the flu, such as pneumonia and death.

It is amazing to me that conventional medicine repeats the mantra about following evidence-based medicine, yet endorses such treatment without any evidence of its effectiveness.

For the flu vaccine, the evidence-based medical advice is clear: It is ineffective and there is no compelling reason to require anyone to receive a yearly flu shot.

Courtesy of NEWSMAX

About Guest Writer