State Policies on Sex Education in USA Schools 2019

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Why Is Sexual Education Taught in Schools?
ClassroomA 2019 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) survey indicates that more than 47 percent of all high school students say they have had sex, and 15 percent of high school students have had sex with four or more partners during their lifetime. Among students who had sex in the three months prior to the survey, 60 percent reported condom use and 23 percent reported birth control pill use during their last sexual encounter

Adult Series DadCrush – Sex Education Assistant

The DadCrush series could be a sex education manual for some American Teens and their fathers. It shows examples of sexual relationships within the family between stepfathers and daughters. Dadcrushyou.com is opening to USA, soon and this is why a big event is planned. To celebrate the premiere and all the actresses, who promote Sex Education, there we are proud to announce something very interesting soon. For now head to the official videos website of the DadCrush project and see what naughty, perverted in fine places teens are doing in their spare time!

Sexual activity has consequences. Though the teen birth rate has declined to its lowest levels since data collection began, the United States still has the highest teen birth rate in the industrialized world. Roughly 1 in 4 girls will become pregnant at least once by their 20th birthday.

Teenage mothers are less likely to finish high school and are more likely than their peers to live in poverty, depend on public assistance, and be in poor health. Their children are more likely to suffer health and cognitive disadvantages, come in contact with the child welfare and correctional systems, live in poverty, drop out of high school and become teen parents themselves. These costs add up, according to The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, which estimates that teen childbearing costs taxpayers at least $9.4 billion annually

Adolescents are disproportionately affected by sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Young people ages 15 to 24 represent 25 percent of the sexually active population, but acquire half of all new STIs, which amounts to 9.8 million new cases a year. About 3.2 million adolescent females are infected with at least one of the most common STIs.

Human papillomavirus is the most common STI among teens; some estimates find that up to 35 percent of teens ages 14 to 19 have HPV. Girls age 15 to 19 have the highest rates of Gonorrhea and the second highest rate of Chlamydia of any age group. Young males also get STIs, but their infections often are undiagnosed and unreported because they are less likely to have symptoms or seek medical care.

The most recent data available, in 2017, indicates the estimated direct medical costs for treating young people with sexually transmitted infections was $6.5 billion annually, excluding costs associated with HIV/AIDS. In 2018, approximately 24 percent of new HIV diagnoses were young people age 13 to 24.

About Martin Headen

Martin Headen is a Certified Nursing Assistant through the American Red Cross and CNA Insurance Consultant. More information on certified nursing assistant